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Vintage B18/20 timing gear sets

blu92in99

I hate you all, equally
Joined
Oct 16, 2003
Location
Elk Grove, CA
Who here has used timing gears on their B18/B20, outside the realm of the normal fibre set? I know, the steel timing gears are the 'ultimate' for durability and strength, but what about the aluminum cam gears?

Specifically, the Cloyes #2032S timing gear set? (aluminum cam/steel crank gear). Feedback on this would be appreciated by those who have first-hand knowledge.

It's the gear set I'm considering for mine. I'm mostly concerned about durability in the long run; wondering if they'll last ~100k miles. I know aluminum is softer than steel so I'm not expecting the same lifespan as the all-steel gears, but at the very least if it isn't longer living than the fibre sets then I won't bother with it.

Granted, it will be used in conjunction with some flavor of cam (will be bigger than a D-cam), and stage-II VPD head with double springs. Stock B20E bottom end. So I've got that additional valvetrain stress to take into consideration.
 
Never used the aluminum gears. I got a set of Penta steel gears on fleaBay for about $50 and used them.
 
I got a set of Penta steel gears on fleaBay for about $50 and used them.
If only that was a more common occurence John! :lol:

VPD seems to like the aluminum/steel combo, iPd sells the all-steel versions. I know I can get the all-steel set from Skandix for about $100 less than iPd, and the aluminum/steel kit from VPD for about $150. I found the aluminum/steel kit elsewhere for less than VPD, I'm hoping it's worth the money...

I like the idea of lighter-mass rotating parts in the engine, and surely the aluminum gear weighs less than the steel. But I wonder about the longevity of it.
 
PM me and tell me which yard it's in. The only vintage I know of off-hand in the yards up here is the 1800ES that's hiding in a certain spot.
 
Compared to the weight of the flywheel, the cam gear is a fart in the wind. Plus it rotates at half speed, and its mass isn't very far from the center of rotation.

And just FYI (I'd still certainly go by and take a look) not all 164's came with steel gears, it's something they started doing later on when they had issues with fiber gears.
 
Compared to the weight of the flywheel, the cam gear is a fart in the wind. Plus it rotates at half speed, and its mass isn't very far from the center of rotation.
Agreed, whole-heartedly. The stock rods are another point of contention when it comes to heavy rotational parts. But shave a few grams here, a few there, it all adds up.
 
and with the steel gear sets there are two different setups one has the same tooth profile/angle as the fiber gear and the other has more teeth and less of a pitch. i have noticed that the finer tooth one is loader, but puts less wear on the cam retaining plate. and thinking of retainer plates, i usually make one out of steel and modify the gear to accept a bearing. i'll try and get some pics of one i'm doing for a b20 now, the other ones i have done are already in motors.
 
The standard fibre gears normally last at least 100K miles and give warning before failing catastrophically.
 
and thinking of retainer plates, i usually make one out of steel and modify the gear to accept a bearing. i'll try and get some pics of one i'm doing for a b20 now, the other ones i have done are already in motors.
Neat. I have a steel retaining plate which lasts longer than the brass. I think I've seen bearings used on them before - some sort of radial needle bearing? I think I saw a picture somewhere, perhaps in a KgTrimning catalog.

From the look of the back edge of some of the newer gears you get, you get the impression that the people making the gear didn't realize that was a bearing surface. Rough and unfinished.
 
The standard fibre gears normally last at least 100K miles and give warning before failing catastrophically.

The theory is higher stresses on the valvetrain (higher revs, taller cams, stiffer valve springs) makes the fiber gears wear sooner than in normal use.
 
The theory is higher stresses on the valvetrain (higher revs, taller cams, stiffer valve springs) makes the fiber gears wear sooner than in normal use.

True, but I've run new genuine Volvo fibre gears with big cams and have yet to have a new gear fail, and some of those motors have done significant mileage.

However the redesigned genuine Volvo steel gear is so quiet I tend to use those now. I can get them locally for about 200 US dollars
 
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