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Koni or Bilstein? 740 track car.

That's interesting. Usually the outer aluminum dust seal housing is just pressed into the tube, and you can remove it with some precision hammering. The inner seal is then held in with a snap ring.
The tricky part is recharging the Nitrogen on a shock body that doesn't have a valve on it. I have no idea how that's done :ROFLMAO:
My current guess is they assemble the shock in a chamber that's nitrogen purged, or they use a needle past the piston...
I had no idea what he was talking about, but he works on a lot of revalving. I need to go observe this sorcery.

I agree on slightly underdamped being faster. That could mean many things to many people, unfortunately.
 
We run much softer springs on our 850 enduro racer. I really like being able to take the curbs at full tilt and not upset the car.
 
Also, another huge benefit of running an inverted monotube instead of a twin tube on a MacPherson strut car is that your camber stiffness is going to be a lot higher, so on a race car where grip is paramount this should really tip the scales in that direction, unless you're just driving for fun or really like tire wear.

That's interesting. Usually the outer aluminum dust seal housing is just pressed into the tube, and you can remove it with some precision hammering. The inner seal is then held in with a snap ring.
The tricky part is recharging the Nitrogen on a shock body that doesn't have a valve on it. I have no idea how that's done :ROFLMAO:
My current guess is they assemble the shock in a chamber that's nitrogen purged, or they use a needle past the piston...
The guy I work with at Bilstein told me that a lot of the new stuff is crimped unfortunately, so if you have an older set of 5100 series or similar dampers they are a lot easier to revalve, only the seal cap and the retaining ring to get into the damper.

FYI for monotubes in production they pour a specific amount of liquid nitrogen into the damper and then assemble it and seal it up before it has time to expand, and then that becomes the pressurized gas volume. For twin tubes they use a tool that can slide past the rod seal and fill the gas that way.
 
Thanks for the explanation(s). For clarification, now that i think about it Drew was not referring to volvo struts, he was talking mercedes slk or neon. Probably neon.
 
Also, another huge benefit of running an inverted monotube instead of a twin tube on a MacPherson strut car is that your camber stiffness is going to be a lot higher, so on a race car where grip is paramount this should really tip the scales in that direction, unless you're just driving for fun or really like tire wear.


The guy I work with at Bilstein told me that a lot of the new stuff is crimped unfortunately, so if you have an older set of 5100 series or similar dampers they are a lot easier to revalve, only the seal cap and the retaining ring to get into the damper.

FYI for monotubes in production they pour a specific amount of liquid nitrogen into the damper and then assemble it and seal it up before it has time to expand, and then that becomes the pressurized gas volume. For twin tubes they use a tool that can slide past the rod seal and fill the gas that way.
Well that’s unfortunate about the 5100s.

Thanks for the explanation on the gas charging. It’s been interesting to see the aftermarket shock companies move away from schrader valves and embrace the needle fill valve. Super simple and effective!
 
FYI for monotubes in production they pour a specific amount of liquid nitrogen into the damper and then assemble it and seal it up before it has time to expand, and then that becomes the pressurized gas volume. For twin tubes they use a tool that can slide past the rod seal and fill the gas that way.

Thats a neat trick.
 
Also, another huge benefit of running an inverted monotube instead of a twin tube on a MacPherson strut car is that your camber stiffness is going to be a lot higher, so on a race car where grip is paramount this should really tip the scales in that direction, unless you're just driving for fun or really like tire wear.

I have also heard arguments that the added friction from an inverted monotube outweighs the gains in stiffness that you get unless you absolutely need the strength like in a rally application. That's why higher end companies like JRZ, ohlins, moton, and MCS don't default to making all struts inverted.

Like all things engineering, there's always trade offs.
 
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